Disclaimer

Forward Looking Statements

This presentation contains statements that may constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of applicable securities legislation. These statements include, among others, statements regarding business strategy, beliefs, plans, goals, objectives, assumptions or statements about future events or performance. By their nature, forward looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, some of which are beyond the Company’s control, including the impact of general economic conditions, industry conditions, volatility of commodity prices, currency fluctuations, environmental risks, competition from other industry participants, lack of availability of qualified personnel or management, stock market volatility and ability to access sufficient capital from internal and external sources. Readers are cautioned that the assumptions used in the preparation of such information, although considered reasonable at the time of preparation, may prove to be incorrect and, as such, undue reliance should not be placed on forward looking statements. Actual results, performance or achievement could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by any forward looking statements in this presentation, and accordingly, no assurance can be given that any of the events anticipated by the forward looking statements will transpire or occur, or if any of them do so, what benefits the Company will derive therefrom. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Reserves and Resources

Except where noted to be from another source, the reserve and resource estimates herein were extracted from reports prepared by GLJ Petroleum Consultants Ltd. (GLJ), an independent professional petroleum engineering firm, in accordance with Canadian Securities Administrators’ National Instrument 51-101 (NI 51-101) and the Canadian Oil and Gas Evaluation Handbook (COGEH). Under NI 51-101, proved reserves are those reserves which can be estimated with a high degree of certainty to be recoverable. It is 90 percent likely that actual remaining quantities will exceed estimated proved reserves. Probable reserves are those additional reserves that are less certain to be recovered than proved reserves. It is equally likely that the actual remaining quantities recovered will be greater or less than the sum of proved plus probable reserves. Possible reserves are those additional reserves that are less certain to be recovered than probable reserves. There is only a 10 percent probability that the quantities actually recovered will equal or exceed the sum of proved plus probable plus possible reserves. Contingent Resources are those quantities of petroleum estimated, as of a given date, to be potentially recoverable from known accumulations using established technology or technology under development, but which are not currently considered to be commercially recoverable due to one or more contingencies. Contingencies may include factors such as economic, legal, environmental, political, and regulatory matters, or a lack of markets. Contingent Resources are further classified in accordance with the level of certainty associated with the estimates and may be sub-classified based on project maturity and/or characterized by their economic status. Resource estimates are described as follows: Best Estimate –This is considered to be the best estimate of the quantity that will actually be recovered from the accumulation. If probabilistic methods are used, there should be at least a 50 percent probability (P50) that the quantities actually recovered will equal or exceed the best estimate.; High Estimate – This is considered to be an optimistic estimate of the quantity that will actually be recovered. It is unlikely that the actual remaining quantities recovered will exceed the high estimate. If probabilistic methods are used, there should be at least a 10 percent probability (P10) that the quantities actually recovered will equal or exceed the high estimate. Low Estimate – this is considered to be a conservative estimate of the quantity that will actually be recovered from the accumulation. If probabilistic methods were used, the term reflects a P90 confidence level.

The preparation of an evaluation requires the use of judgment in applying the standards and definitions contained in COGEH and NI 51-101. As the Company’s independent reserve evaluator, GLJ applies those standards and definitions based on its experience and knowledge of industry practice. However, because the application of the standards and definitions contained in COGEH and NI 51-101 require the use of judgment there is no assurance that governing securities regulator(s) will not take a different view than GLJ as to some of the determinations in an evaluation. In that regard on May 29, 2013 the Alberta Securities Commission (ASC) issued Staff Notice 51-702 (Staff Notice) in respect of the certainty levels associated with the estimation and classification of oil and gas reserves and resources based on the ASC staff’s interpretation of COGEH. As the Company understands the Staff Notice, if followed the ASC staff’s interpretation as set out in the Staff Notice would result in the reclassification of the probable reserves assigned to the Saleski Joint Venture in the December 31, 2013 GLJ report to Best Estimate Contingent Resources. While GLJ has stated it believes that the reserves and resources data set forth in the report were, in all material respects, determined and are in accordance with COGEH, given the different interpretation by the ASC, the Company has elected not to report reserves at the Saleski Joint Venture at this time, and instead has included the volumes and values with Best Estimate Contingent Resources.

Unless otherwise stated, all figures presented in Canadian Dollars.